Angles https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles Description de votre site fr Coordonnées https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1927 Editor : Yan Brailowskyyan.brailowsky@parisnanterre.fr Varia section: varia.angles@saesfrance.org mar., 07 janv. 2020 00:00:00 +0100 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1927 Upcoming issues / Calls for proposals https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1614 Each thematic issue contains 8–12 articles selected by a Guest editor after a double-blind peer-review process. Each issue also contains 2-4 non-thematic articles in a ‘Varia’ section. Proposals for New Thematic Issues and proposals for the ‘Varia’ section Please refer to the submission guidelines for details: https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr/index.php?id=80 Upcoming Thematic Issues and Call for Papers Dedicated calls for papers may be posted for some of the upcoming issues (listed in alphabetical order, not by order of publication): Reinventing the Sea (Guest editors: Geetha Ganapathy-Dore & Ludmila Volna) – CFP closed Creating the Enemy / Images of the Enemy (Guest editor: Jacob Maillet & Cécile Dudouyt) – CFP closed Are You Game? (Guest editor: Gilles Bertheau) The Torn Object: Experimentation in Contemporary Anglophone Literature, Art and Film (Guest editor: Andrew Hodgson) For more information on these thematic issues, please contact the Guest editor(s) directly, as each issue has its own deadlines. mer., 18 déc. 2019 00:00:00 +0100 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1614 The Torn Object: Experimentation in Contemporary Anglophone Literature, Art and Film https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1938 This issue will be guest edited by Dr Andrew Hodgson, Université Paris Est (andrew.hodgson@u-pem.fr). Proposal Deadline: 25th January 2020 Final Article Submission Deadline: 1st July 2020 Rubric The histories of experimentation in anglophone artistic production are something of a rocky terrain. The word ‘experimental’ itself taking on toxic overtones over the course of the 20th century. As Morton Levitt writes of the British context, “for British authors and critics it has for decades been a pejorative.” As a critical descriptor, or mode of creation and engagement, it has long been avoided in favour of the more general ‘innovative’ or the more ideologically charged ‘modernist.’ The application of either presenting limitations when attempting to address the histories of what might be termed ‘critical representation,’ the ‘aesthetically challenging’ in artistic production in the contemporary anglophone cultural sphere. However, in recent years this toxicity has begun to be critically questioned, and the artistic artefacts and experimental modes of production lost in the liminal spaces within/between these descriptors of innovative or modernist have begun to reappear in criticism and publication/showing/retrospective as result of this process of reassessment. If the current reassessments anglophone cultural history is undergoing has centred renegotiations of established canon artefacts, and canon theories of those artefacts, this Angles special issue ‘The Torn Object’ seeks to mer., 20 nov. 2019 00:00:00 +0100 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1938 Editorial Team https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=85 Angles: New Perspectives on the Anglophone World (ISSN: 2274-2042) is published by the SAES (Société des Anglicistes de l’Enseignement Supérieur). Publisher Wilfrid Rotgé, President of the SAES Editor Yan Brailowsky, Université Paris Nanterre Editorial Board Pascale Antolin, Université de Bordeaux Emmanuelle de Champs, Université de Cergy Claire Chaplier, Université Paul Sabatier-Toulouse III Anne-Valérie Dulac, Sorbonne Université David Fee, Université Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Laura Goudet, Université de Rouen Board of Referees Jean Albrespit (Université de Pau), Jean-Paul Gabilliet (Université Michel de Montaigne-Bordeaux 3), Bernard Genton (Université de Strasbourg), Vanessa Guignery (ENS Lyon), Sarah Hatchuel (Université du Havre), Kate Hodgson (University of Liverpool), Ariane Hudelet (Université Paris Diderot), Rob Kroes (Universiteit van Amsterdam), Françoise Le Jeune (Université de Nantes), Aliyah Morgenstern (Université de Paris Sorbonne Nouvelle), Frédéric Ogée (Université Paris Diderot), Miles Orvell (Temple University), Sandrine Parageau (Université Paris Nanterre), Rahma Jerad (Université de Carthage), Frédéric Regard (Sorbonne Université), Jean-Paul Revauger (Université Michel de Montaigne-Bordeaux 3), Virginie Roiron (IEP Strasbourg), Caroline Rolland-Diamond (Université Paris Nanterre), Alan Wallach (College of William and Mary), Andrew Williams (University of St Andrews), Leo Zeilig (University of the Witwatersrand) ven., 25 oct. 2019 00:00:00 +0200 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=85 Editorial Policy https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=74 Angles: New Perspectives on the Anglophone World (ISSN: 2274-2042) is an international, scholarly, peer-reviewed journal published bi-annually online by the SAES (Société des Anglicistes de l’Enseignement Supérieur). It is indexed by MLA, EBSCO, ERIH Plus, and others. Aim and Scope This interdisciplinary journal has a triple aim: to encourage innovative interdisciplinary research; to make cutting-edge research freely available through an open access policy; to make full use of the possibilities offered by digital publication and different modes of expression: text, image, video, podcasts, hyperlinks… Each thematic issue contains 8–12 articles selected by a guest editor after a double-blind peer-review process. Additional, off-topic articles submitted to the same process are published in a separate ‘Varia’ section. These off-topic articles may respond to articles previously published in Angles. The journal fosters scholarly risk-taking and experimentation by junior and senior researchers. Angles accepts academic contributions partly, or wholly, in non-traditional forms (documentary film, short story, comic book, manifesto, pamphlet…). Angles also encourages proposals from specialists wishing to explore a different field of study than their own. Prospective guest editors should be willing to submit their introduction to their thematic issue in a non-traditional format, typically in the form of a video. The journal’s Editorial Team usually assists guest editors in this regard, a mar., 18 juin 2019 00:00:00 +0200 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=74 Submission guidelines https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=80 For a speedy treatment of all submissions, please follow the following guidelines. Submission procedure Material submitted to Angles must not been published previously, in part or in whole, and should not be simultaneously under consideration for publication elsewhere. Inquiries should be sent to the General Editor: yan.brailowsky@parisnanterre.fr All submissions should be uploaded to the submissions website: https://submit.angles.saesfrance.org/ Receipt of proposals will be acknowledged by email. Topic submission for a thematic issue Prospective Guest editors are invited to send the following data to the General Editor: name(s), email(s), affiliation(s), short bio(s); proposed topic for the thematic section, with a rationale or a sample Call for Papers (500-750 words max.); list of prospective contributors (if applicable). All topics should relate to the Anglophone world (e.g. in the choice of corpus, theoretical framework, etc.), without limitation on the discipline or the approach chosen. We particularly welcome proposals that include different sub-disciplines, periods, geographic areas, etc. All submissions must be in English only. Prospective guest editors should be willing to submit their introduction to their thematic issue in a non-traditional format, typically in the form of a video. The journal’s Editorial Team usually assists guest editors in this regard, and you do not need prior video-making skills to submit a proposal. Please note that proposals stemming from c mar., 18 juin 2019 00:00:00 +0200 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=80 Are you game? https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1896 For an upcoming issue of Angles: New Perspectives on the Anglophone World, a peer-reviewed journal indexed by MLA, ERIH-Plus, EBSCO and others, we welcome proposals on “Are you game?” This issue will be guest edited by Gilles Bertheau (gilles.bertheau@univ-tours.fr). Call for papers “Are you game?” can be a playful version of “I dare you!” While the latter formulation pre-supposes that one’s opponent will chicken out, the former is more inclusive and invites more joyful cooperation. The expression therefore combines the promise of a cooperative show of bravery, and the defiant invitation to a playful duel. In earlier times, games, gaming, and gambling were far from being self-evident pastimes. In early modern England, games were accused by Puritans of diverting subjects from their religious duties, particularly on the Sabbath day. The matter was pressing enough for King James I to issue A Declaration of Sports (1617), later re-issued by his son Charles I in 1633, to allow dancing, May-Games, leaping, vaulting and Morris-dances, among others, after the end of divine service, while continuing to condemn games of chance like dice and cards. The fight against Sabbatarianism in 17th-century England underlines the parlous status of games in society. The word itself covers a host of activities, be it games of cards, chess (the philosophers’ game) and other parlour games, games of skill, physical games and gambling. Games touch upon many aspects of individual as well as collective li mar., 04 juin 2019 00:00:00 +0200 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1896 Graphic Interlude: Neoliberalism in the Anglophone World https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1882 This graphic interlude features a poster illustrating this issue’s topic: neoliberalism, the workings of financialisation and means of resistance against this system. Cet interlude graphique est composé d’une affiche qui illustre le thème de ce numéro, le néolibéralisme. Il détaille les mécanismes de financiarisation du monde et les moyens de résistance. ven., 05 avril 2019 00:00:00 +0200 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1882 Video introduction to issue #8 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1872 This video introduces the thematic contributions on ‘Neoliberalism in the Anglophone world’. La vidéo présente les contributions thématiques sur « Le néolibéralisme dans le monde ». lun., 25 mars 2019 00:00:00 +0100 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1872 Creating the Enemy: Forms and Functions of the Enemy Image https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1633 For an upcoming issue of Angles: New Perspectives on the Anglophone World, a peer-reviewed journal indexed by MLA, ERIH-Plus, EBSCO and others, we welcome proposals on “Creating the Enemy: Forms and Functions of the Enemy Image”. This issue will be guest edited by Jacob Maillet (jacob.maillet@parisdescartes.fr) and Cécile Dudouyt (cecile.dudouyt@univ-paris13.fr). Call for papers This issue of Angles proposes to explore processes of othering and scapegoating through the creation of “enemy images” in Anglophone countries, from the early modern period and onwards, in the press, fiction, political discourse, film and social media. The concept of the “enemy image” was particularly developed in the final chapter of the Cold War by American psychiatrist Jerome D. Frank (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine) and Soviet researcher Andrei Y. Melville (Institute of USA and Canada Studies). Building on the idea of “mirror images” in International Relations, Frank and Melville showed that in times of conflict, evil characteristics will be attributed to an enemy and that such negative perceptions will show in the media coverage of the conflict, thus fueling hatred on both sides. They posited as well that the enemy image also had a number of domestic functions: […] the hysteria about the outer threat is often used as justification for secrecy and suspicion, covert actions, policies creating “mobilized” societies, artificial national unity, “witch hunts,” and policies suppressing di ven., 15 févr. 2019 00:00:00 +0100 https://angles.edel.univ-poitiers.fr:443/angles/index.php?id=1633